Diabetes Education

Managing Your Diabetes

Until the creation of insulin in 1921, all patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes died within years of being diagnosed. Today, although insulin is not a cure, it is certainly a historic breakthrough. Diabetes patients are encouraged to eat healthy and balance insulin with daily diet and activities. Patients will also monitor their blood glucose levels daily. Because 65% of people with diabetes die from heart problems, they are also encouraged to manage blood pressure and cholesterol levels to lower their risk. People who let their blood glucose levels get too low can suffer from hypoglycemia, which causes the patient to become nervous, confused and impair judgment. Those whose blood glucose levels get too high will suffer from hyperglycemia.

Although many people with diabetes will seek their health care from their primary care physicians, some patients will develop a team of professionals to help manage diabetes more carefully. The professionals can include doctors specializing in endocrinology, dietitians, nurses, certified diabetes educators, podiatrists, and even ophthalmologists to help deal with every aspect of diabetic symptoms. Patients who keep their blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible will reduce their risk of developing major complications of type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes.

Marci Sloane, MS, RD, LD/N, CDE

Article was reviewed by Marci Sloane, a registered and licensed dietitian/nutritionist and certified diabetes educator. Marci graduated with a degree in Nutrition and Physiology from Teachers College at Columbia University. Marci manages a Diabetes and Nutrition Education Center in South Florida and is the author of The Diet Game: Playing for Life! More about Marci Sloane

The goal of Destination Diabetes is to be a useful and credible resource for the more than 20 million children and adults who have diabetes in the U.S. and their families. Destination Diabetes provides information on a wide range of diabetes health and wellness topics. Articles are written or reviewed by diabetes advisors who have experience in diabetes education.