People with diabetes want to get the latest facts about their health condition. Knowledge is power, especially when it comes to the effective self-management of diabetes. Learn how to use the web to find the most accurate information about diabetes and how to spot inaccuracies.

  • Unfortunately, not all of the information about diabetes found online is based on facts. Following poor advice can worsen your condition and lead to more serious health problems. Even your friends and family could be sources of misleading information. Know the facts before you make any changes in your current diabetes self-management routine. Always verify information with your health care team before taking action. Use the information to have a meaningful conversation with your doctors, who are well-trained professionals with the right facts at their fingertips.
  • The National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is a reliable resource for basic information about diabetes. This government organization translates science through public health leadership, research, partnerships, programs and policies to reduce the burden of diabetes. The Division of Diabetes Translation is a part of the CDC, which is in turn part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). With over 100 employees and additional public health advisors in the field, they are an excellent resource for the latest information about diabetes care and treatment.
  • Another dependable resource for diabetes information is WebMD. They offer ongoing updates about health and medicine. The materials are continuously reviewed by an Independent Medical Review Board to ensure timeliness and accuracy. Their website provides information about medical news, online community programs and more. Keep in mind WebMD is not a substitute for a consultation with a real-life doctor. People with diabetes need to maintain regular appointments with their health care team.
  • Manufacturer websites such as the Abbott Laboratories Freestyle website or the Bayer CONTOUR website offer accurate information about the use of their products. For example, what if you were using a Medtronic insulin pump at midnight and had a simple question about its functionality? Your doctor might not be in the office but you could turn to the website to review frequently asked questions for an answer. Always ask your doctor for detailed instructions about diabetes medicine and supplies based on your unique health care needs. Manufacturer websites are only meant to use for general questions.
  • Certain blogs are also a reliable source of information about diabetes. Diabetes suppliers such as American Diabetes Wholesale have medical professional’s on-staff to contribute blog content. This ensures the material is accurate and up-to-date. Look for blogs administered by doctors and registered nurses rather than everyday people. These types of blogs are used to confirm and expand on information already provided by your health care team.
  • Be wary of individual blogs written by people with diabetes or affiliate marketers trying to sell diabetes products. If the blog is not administered by legitimate medical professionals, it could provide harmful advice. The wrong information can lead to serious health complications for people with diabetes.
  • Forums are a great place to connect with other people who have diabetes. They can offer the reassurance and companionship you need but should not be considered a reliable resource for factual information. Some people at forums simply do not know the facts about diabetes and speak from their own experience only. There are other forums that are moderated by medical professionals. This can be a golden opportunity to ask a medical pro a quick questions but it should not be a substitute for consulting with your own doctors.

The Internet is an amazing resource that is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a weeks. It is a great place to go when you have a basic question or need product information in an emergency if you turn to the right websites. Remember online resources can be unreliable and are never a substitute for consulting with real-life doctors.