What could make us feel more helpless than an ailing pet? We wish they could tell us how they feel, and we want to do whatever possible to alleviate their discomfort.

Take heart. When the ailment is diabetes, there’s a bounty of hope and many new restorative supplements formulated just for diabetic pets.

Among the best is Native Remedies’ PetAlive GlucoBalance, not just an excellent supplement, but also a way to help pets reduce high cholesterol, improve immune functioning and treat and prevent the symptoms of diabetes-related conditions such as eye, bladder and circulation problems.

Signs to watch for

Just as in humans, a lack of insulin in pets sets up a series of events that result in many telltale symptoms. Excessive urination and water consumption, disproportionate eating, lethargy and weight loss are the most common.

Dogs often are diagnosed when the owner notices the dog has suddenly gone blind, due to the extremely rapid cataract development that frequently occurs in diabetic dogs.

In cats, owners may become aware of a weakening of the cat’s rear legs or that it is walking on its hocks.


Diabetes occurs in about one of every 400-500 dogs and cats. Here are some important factors to keep in mind:

  • Age – Most cats are over six years old, with 75% between eight and 13. Most dogs are between seven and nine years old. Although much less common, diabetes has been seen in very young cats and dogs.
  • Gender – Neutered male cats and un-spayed female dogs are more prone to diabetes.
  • Breed – No breed predisposition appears in cats, but in dogs, keeshonds, pulis, miniature pinschers and cairn terriers have a genetic predisposition to diabetes and poodles, dachshunds, miniature schnauzers and beagles appear to be at higher risk.