Like other people, I had been drinking more liquids and going to the bathroom more, but I didn’t think much of it. I also felt tired, very tired, in the afternoons. Since I was in my early 40’s, I figured it came from getting older. But when I went for my annual physical, my doctor informed me otherwise. Her words were: “You’re diabetic, but that doesn’t mean you won’t live as long a life as anyone else. I’m giving you this medication and sending you to training in 2 weeks.”

When I went to training, I had diligently followed my doctor’s orders, but they discovered that my glucose was a 330, anyway. It was then that they decided I was Type 1. I was allowed to go home, but I had to appear the next morning to learn how to inject myself. When they asked if I had ever injected myself, I rather wondered if I looked like a “druggie” and joked with them that no, that was nothing I had EVER done. I hate needles!

Well, from that day on, my life has changed–the needles took some getting used to. But, with my glucose now under control, I felt so very much better!!! I had practiced Tae Kwon Do and had made it to first-degree black belt. But I never progressed forward because I didn’t feel energetic enough to survive any more of those tests. I am very happy to say that I have been able to take not one, but two tests–to make it to third degree black belt!

The most annoying thing about having diabetes is the “I feel so bad for you–you poor thing” attitude I see from some people. This is something that I deal with, but it will NOT define me! It’s what a MANAGE day-to-day. The most frustrating thing I found about diabetes is trying to control it. (And there are so very many documents, both online and in print, that talk about “controlling” your diabetes.)

One day, when talking with a very close friend who helps me to put things in perspective, I discovered that I can follow my doctors’ directions, I can do what I’m told to do, but I cannot CONTROL what my body does with the food I put into it, the stress it endures, etc. The word that should be used is: MANAGE. You can MANAGE what you do.

I have to deal with this the rest of my life, I expect. (We don’t have a cure yet, but maybe someday we will.) In the meantime, I will leave you with three thoughts:

1. Diabetes is MANAGEABLE. (Unlike cancer or other serious complications.
2. Do not let it define you! It is what you deal with, not who you are.
3. Live your life to the fullest–every day! Challenge yourself!

By Jeanninehh

ADW Diabetes

ADW Diabetes is a diabetic supply mail order company that is dedicated to keeping diabetes management affordable. ADW takes a leading role in offering free diabetic education through Destination Diabetes, an informational component of the ADW website featuring tips and advice from diabetes and nutrition experts, diabetic recipes and more.

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