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  • Counting Carbs ??


    I would appreciate to hear some opinions and alternatives to this.

    I the last 1.5 years, I found out that I was Diabetic. I also have Hep C and my liver issues can limit potential medications.

    On my latest medical visit, I was told to go on the following routine before eating and injecting my short term insulin (Humalog)
    • Test my blood sugar
    • Calculate how many carbs I will be eating
    • Do a calculation based on how many potential Carbs I will be eating and my blood sugar reading.
    • Inject an amount of Insulin (Humalog), that is contingent on this calculation.
    My question is that I feel that this is unrealistic for me. I have changed my diet entirely as well as my other routines. I feel for me to comply to a ritual, I need to allow it to fit into my lifestyle. The counting Carbs component is one that I feel that I won't and cannot do.

    I find it rigorous enough to take my blood sugar readings before eating and injecting myself with my "short lasting insulin". Depending on my score, I was adjusting my insulin intake, pre-meal. I thought, that this was going pretty well.

    I have adjusted my eating so that I eat NO processed foods and focus on eating foods/meals that are low in Carbs. Most of the protein I eat is from plants. If I do have meat, it will be Kosher or organically farmed. It is amazing how much better food tastes since doing this.

    I would love to get opinions on this and the sharing of experiences.

    Thanks,

    Jon T.

  • #2
    Whatever works to keep you in range!

    Carb counting gives you more dietary freedom and prevents you from doing "shot in the dark" (i.e. guessing) dosing. It makes insulin dosing more precise, so you reduce your risk of low blood sugar and high blood sugar after meals or high blood sugar correction doses.

    I have been doing this for years, although sometimes I admit I get lazy. However, once you know what you're doing, it's not hard or any more time consuming.

    I have Type 1 diabetes, and this is the best way for me. If you have Type 2 diabetes, you may not need to be as precise with your insulin dosing. One alternative solution is to take the same amount of insulin at every meal, and eat exactly the same amount of carbs (i.e. the same foods) everyday. People who have trouble with math or find counting carbs too confusing do best with this method. A dietitian can help you set up a meal plan.

    Overall, there is no right or wrong way. If you are able to control your blood sugars just fine, continue what you have been doing.

    Comment


    • #3
      The carb craze seemed to come and go like a flash in the pan. Of course the impact to diabetics is a bit different, but if even diabetics look at the idea of carb counting as silly as the rest of us, it's not going to be a lot of help.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Cassy View Post
        The carb craze seemed to come and go like a flash in the pan. Of course the impact to diabetics is a bit different, but if even diabetics look at the idea of carb counting as silly as the rest of us, it's not going to be a lot of help.
        Totally. If you mean low carb dieting like Atkins, this is a trend that has come and gone. Eating bacon 6 times per day is not healthy, no matter what! I think we all know that! Now, most Type 2 diabetics *should* limit their carb intake, but no one should try to restrict themselves to virtually 0. There are some diabetes educators who disagree and say that diabetics should eat the least amount of carbs possible. Richard Bernstein is one of them. He says that the ADA diet is destroying diabetics and setting them up for complications and weight gain because it is so high in carbs. Most people think a healthy "middle of the road" approach works best. This being a moderate amount of healthy carbs such as brown rice and apples.

        "Carb counting" is a term that is really best used for those who need insulin, particularly in Type 1 diabetics. For instance a meal for me looks like this:

        I know that I need 1 unit of insulin for every 15 grams of carbs, so if I eat an apple (15 grams) and a sandwich (30 grams), I need to take 3 units of insulin. It makes it easy to figure out how much insulin I need. Now of course it's usually not so simple, but either way, it works for me in most cases. I'll never have 100% normal blood sugars, but it does help to keep me in a closer range. I also have the freedom to pretty much eat whatever I want if I know the carb content, so I can adjust my insulin dose. That doesn't mean I go crazy, just that I can have a treat if I really want it and still be in range.

        Comment


        • #5
          Counting carbs really can be difficult to begin with, but right now I am doing a great deal of it. I hope to control my insulin resistance if I can without meds, for as long as I can and all I can say is that in time it gets easier. You get used to doing it, and you get used to portion sizes, so you can guess that a certain amount of rice is so many grams, or that a pasta side has this many.

          Its way better than just doing shot in the dark. And I'm losing weight too!

          Comment


          • #6
            Carb counting ??

            Britjojo,

            THANKS so much for taking the time to post on this topic.

            I would like to tell you that I don't eat ANY Rice or Pasta !!

            However, I do eat some organic "Soy Pasta" which I recommend. While conventional Pasta tastes better, this product seems to be one of the healthiest foods I have seen. It fulfills a Pasta fix for me.

            I will eat, maybe one slice of whole grain bread a day. I make pseudo sandwiches by wrapping a single slice of bread over my food, or using soy cheese to wrap my "main course".
            Link to soy pasta that I have used.
            http://www.amazon.com/Nutrition-Kitc...1683291&sr=8-1
            Nutritional Info about product
            http://www.amazon.com/Nutrition-Kitc...106097-0541623

            In general, I have found Amazon.com a good resource to finding special foods.

            The above links, this is not an endorsement of the product that I am linking to, but simply informational for those, like me, who are in constant search for low-carb alternatives. I promise you I have no affiliation whatsoever.

            Thanks,

            Jon T.

            Comment


            • #7
              In truth since I came to America I haven't found any good soy cheeses. I used to love them in the UK, but the only ones here contain cassein and that tastes like rubber. So I stopped.

              Now that I am nursing a child, I can't have soy. So that's messed up too!

              Comment


              • #8
                For years I have heard that soy was supposed to be the wonder food. I remember hearing that in the future they would make soy taste like everything from Steak to milk. I haven't seen a lot of success in this yet!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi there,

                  I think the problem is with no of calories ie intake for diabetics. There are some prescribed norms as far as diabetics are concerned. You have to consult a dietitian and make a plan for diet that suits your lifestyle. Low corb is good and more liquid diet is best suggested. Any diet that shoots up sugar levels must be avoided. So take your dicision for a balanced diet.


                  Thanks

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jolo View Post

                    I would appreciate to hear some opinions and alternatives to this.

                    I the last 1.5 years, I found out that I was Diabetic. I also have Hep C and my liver issues can limit potential medications.

                    On my latest medical visit, I was told to go on the following routine before eating and injecting my short term insulin (Humalog)
                    • Test my blood sugar
                    • Calculate how many carbs I will be eating
                    • Do a calculation based on how many potential Carbs I will be eating and my blood sugar reading.
                    • Inject an amount of Insulin (Humalog), that is contingent on this calculation.
                    My question is that I feel that this is unrealistic for me. I have changed my diet entirely as well as my other routines. I feel for me to comply to a ritual, I need to allow it to fit into my lifestyle. The counting Carbs component is one that I feel that I won't and cannot do.

                    I find it rigorous enough to take my blood sugar readings before eating and injecting myself with my "short lasting insulin". Depending on my score, I was adjusting my insulin intake, pre-meal. I thought, that this was going pretty well.

                    I have adjusted my eating so that I eat NO processed foods and focus on eating foods/meals that are low in Carbs. Most of the protein I eat is from plants. If I do have meat, it will be Kosher or organically farmed. It is amazing how much better food tastes since doing this.

                    I would love to get opinions on this and the sharing of experiences.

                    Thanks,

                    Jon T.
                    I am a big beliver that whole natural foods, especially taken in bulk every day will cleanse and detox the body. The liver needs to be detoxed and is very important for health. The best ways of cleansing and detoxing the liver that I have found is by juicing vegetables especially greens like turnip greens,collard greens, wheat grass, etc. These have very little sugars in them but you can do a check to be sure you are not spiking. Spirilina can be bought as a powder and so can wheat juice, I higly recommend them both. Also brussell sprouts have a natural insulin in them and will lessen your need for injections.

                    Comment

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