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  • Do you use an insulin pump?

    I've been using an insulin pump for almost 8 years and can't even begin to fathom how it would be to go back to shots.
    I don't ever want to have to do that.
    I love my pump, it's made a huge difference in my blood sugars and made my life so much easier!

  • #2
    I know you posted this a long time ago but I am now taking pump classes with clinic to get my son on the pump. I am so afraid since he is still young that it will be a bad decision.I have everything under control with his insulin and i have gotten the EVERYTHING down . What I am trying to ask is how as it change your lifestyles and would you presonal recommend a 3yr old for the pump?

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    • #3
      Nope

      I prefer the shots. I like to snorkel and free dive and pumps arent made for 2 ATM. they also become bothersome when I am waterfall climbing.
      I am glad that you like it though!

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      • #4
        all that sounds exciting but my 3yr old isn't doing any of that yet

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        • #5
          Originally posted by supermom03 View Post
          all that sounds exciting but my 3yr old isn't doing any of that yet
          A 3 yr. old? That may be a tad bit young. I'm pumping, love mine but that's a huge responsibility to put on a 3 yr. old!!

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          • #6
            I have a cousin using an insulin pump and it's so much better thn the shots that I can't see how people lived without them before.

            Of course, I have a couple of older relatives who still do shots, but they are comfortable with shots and are probably too old to change their ways!

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            • #7
              I had been thinking that I would maybe get a pump during the years that my diabetes had been in control. I had read about it and thought that it was a good idea.

              But now that I am again taking insulin, I am rethinking getting the pump going.

              For the chemotherapy I was taking, they inserted a port in my chest so that I could be hooked up to an IV easily. That small port can't be seen and I can only feel it if I search for it, but once I do feel it, I am sickened.

              The idea that I'd be again fixed with an unnatural thing to keep me going makes me cringe. I doubt that I will get the pump now -- especially when I still hope I will once again get to go off insulin.

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              • #8
                I had been using both insulin pump and shots. I personally know a handful of people who are much satisfied with insulin pumps and others with shots. In the end it really depends on how much amount of sugar is reduced in the body.

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                • #9
                  He did fine with his trail pump we are taking more classes and I i have met parents whos children have been pumping from the age of 1 so that was comforting to know he not starting off to young.

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                  • #10
                    average age for pump

                    The new guidelines from the pump companies are 7 years old.
                    the reason being is they have to be able to bolus and add what has been eaten.
                    There have been instances at day care centers where the caregivers didn't know how to use the pump and the children were given either the wrong amount , no amount or too much.
                    A 7 year old has a majority fo verbal skills to let some one known if something is wrong, is able to read and able to comprehend.

                    Now they are in development a momy and me pump system. it sends a signal to the receiver that mommy wears and mommy can come and adjust the flow. It is strictly for basal amounts no bolus unless the alarm goes off. They use it for infants in certain hospitals but it is not available to the public as of yet.

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                    • #11
                      Does anyone feel a little strange when they permit a machine to take over the upkeep of their blood sugar control? In one way I can see it as a great relief to not have to think about it, but then I imagine that the machine is really in charge and that I am just a cog that it is directing.

                      In one way I feel rather good knowing that I am in charge. It's like the way I feel when I am offered an electric chair to use. I would rather use my energy to work the chair then to sit back and let the machine do it for me.

                      Maybe it all has to do with my feeling in control rather then being controlled.

                      Who knows, my attitude might change as time passes.

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                      • #12
                        Hi there,

                        Its really an interesting discussion about the various approaches that are being followed in taking insulin. Apart from this, I would like to ask a question regarding the safety. which is the safe method, either pump or injections?

                        I have done some web research to find out which is the safe method and I found that "Pump" is safe. There are many surveys conducted and finally it was decided that pump is safe. I found one link by name Medline plus which says pump is more safer than taking shots. For more details Please visit the link HERE.

                        Thanks

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                        • #13
                          I found an article about this, I hope it will help you (http://www.health.com/health/conditi...9216_2,00.html)

                          Get the facts

                          Your options:
                          * Get an insulin pump.
                          * Keep doing insulin injections.

                          Key points to remember:
                          * An insulin pump can free you from a strict regimen of meals, sleep, and exercise, because you can program it to match your changing schedule.
                          * After you learn how to work with a pump, it can make living with diabetes easier. But it takes some time and effort to learn how to use the pump to keep it working properly and to control your diabetes.
                          * Using a pump includes checking your blood sugar 4 or more times a day and carefully counting the grams of carbohydrate that you eat.
                          * If you give yourself shots 2 times a day or less, having a pump may help you keep your blood sugar in your target range. If you are already giving yourself shots 3 or more times a day, a pump may not improve your control, or it may improve your control only slightly.
                          * Using an insulin pump can keep your blood sugar at a more constant level so that you don't have as many big swings in your levels. People who use pumps have fewer problems with very low blood sugar.
                          * Insulin pumps cost as much as $6,000. Many insurance companies cover the cost of insulin pumps, but they have strict guidelines that you will have to follow before they will pay.

                          What is an insulin pump?

                          An insulin pump constantly gives you a small amount of insulin, called a "basal rate," throughout the day and night to help control your blood sugar. When you need extra insulin to cover a meal or to correct high blood sugar, you tell the pump to give you a small dose of rapid-acting insulin.

                          You wear the insulin pump Click here to see an illustration., which is about the size of a deck of cards, clipped to a belt or somewhere in your clothing. Plastic tubing connects the pump to a catheter just under your skin. The catheter is a tiny plastic tube that you insert into your skin using a special needle. You have to change the catheter every 2 or 3 days.

                          A pump does not work by itself. You have to program it. It will not measure your blood sugar, so you will still have to do that. It will not deliver extra rapid-acting insulin unless you tell it to. For example, if you figure out that you need an extra 5 units of insulin to cover a meal, you have to punch in that number on the pump.

                          You can disconnect the pump from the catheter site for brief periods when you want to go swimming or take a shower.
                          What are the benefits of using an insulin pump?

                          * With a pump, you can plan your insulin around your life instead of planning your life around your insulin shots. Your basal rate is set and runs automatically. If you decide to stay out late, skip a meal, or work at a job with changing shifts, you can adjust your insulin at the push of a button.
                          * Instead of giving yourself shots several times a day, you only need to insert a catheter needle once every 2 or 3 days.
                          * With a pump, you don't have to stop what you're doing and pull out a syringe or an insulin pen to give yourself insulin. You just push a button to give yourself the right dose.
                          * A pump may help you keep your blood sugar in your target range. People who use a pump have fewer big swings in their blood sugar levels.
                          * Pumps work well for people who can't find an insulin dose that keeps blood sugar under control without also causing low blood sugar.

                          What are the drawbacks of using an insulin pump?

                          * You may have to stay in the hospital, or spend a whole day at a clinic, while you learn how to use your pump.
                          * Setting your basal rates for the first time may take a few days. You may have to skip a few meals and check your sugar levels extra often while you get used to the pump.
                          * People who keep their sugar levels in a tight range may be less able to sense when their blood sugar is low. So you will need to check your blood sugar often, at least 4 times a day, when you use an insulin pump.
                          * If you are not good at counting your carbohydrate grams, an insulin pump may not help you control your diabetes.
                          * Infection at the area where the catheter goes into the skin is a common problem with insulin pumps. It is one of the most common reasons why people stop using pumps. So it's important to take good care of the site and change the catheter on schedule.
                          * The pump could stop working without your noticing. A pump has an alarm system to tell you when something is wrong with insulin delivery or if the pump's battery is getting low. But the alarm system will not tell you if the catheter is bent or has pulled out, so it's important to check the site often.
                          * Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a life-threatening condition, may happen more often and more quickly with an insulin pump than with injections. Your blood sugar could get too high if something goes wrong with the catheter or pump without your noticing. Most studies show that this is usually not a problem with training and practice.
                          * Insulin pumps cost as much as $6,000. Many insurance companies will pay for insulin pumps, but they have strict guidelines that you will have to follow before they will pay.

                          Why might your doctor recommend an insulin pump?

                          Your doctor might encourage you to get an insulin pump if:

                          * You have big swings in your blood sugar levels,
                          * You cannot find an insulin dose that keeps your blood sugar under control without also causing low blood sugar.
                          * Your eating and activity schedules change a lot, making it hard to schedule insulin shots.
                          * You don't need more than 100 units of insulin each day.

                          Compare your options:


                          Using an insulin pump
                          What is usually involved?

                          * Instead of giving yourself insulin shots every day, you insert a catheter every few days.
                          * The pump stays attached to you, through the catheter, 24 hours a day.
                          * You test your blood sugar often, and you carefully count carbs so that you can program the pump.
                          * Infusion sites can get infected, so it's important to know how to place the catheter correctly and to keep the area clean.

                          What are the benefits?

                          * People who use pumps have fewer big swings in their blood sugar levels.
                          * People who use pumps have fewer problems with very low blood sugar.
                          * For some people, pumps improve hemoglobin A1c levels.1

                          What are the risks and side effects?

                          * Using a pump may not improve blood-sugar control in people who are already giving themselves insulin shots 3 or more times a day.
                          * People who keep their sugar levels in a tight range—which a pump helps you to do—may be less able to sense when their blood sugar is low.
                          * Infections are common at the catheter site.
                          * The pump could stop working without your noticing.

                          Not using an insulin pump
                          What is usually involved?

                          * You keep giving yourself daily insulin shots to control your blood sugar.

                          What are the benefits?

                          * For some people, daily shots work well to control blood sugar.
                          * Daily insulin shots may work better than a pump for people who need more than 100 units of insulin a day.

                          What are the risks and side effects?

                          * Daily shots may not control your blood sugar as well as a pump would.
                          * People who use daily shots have more problems with very low blood sugar.
                          Last edited by selenagemez; 06-22-2011, 07:03 PM.

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