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  • Difference between 1 and 2

    Okay, I was talking to my partner last night and he told me that he is type one and now I am confused and not sure why I thought he was type 2 in the first place.

    I asked him what does it mean and he said full blown diabetis. I can't accpet this as an explaination. He has left me a little confused.

  • #2
    long explanation

    A diabetic can go from type 2 to type 1.Its absed on insulin secretion levels and how well or not how well oral medications controlled his diabetes.

    I did teh same thing went from type 2 to type 1.
    In type 2 theer are different varaiations. You can be secreting insluin but your body is not using it, you can be over producing glycogen and there isnt enough natuarrly produced insulin to balance it..a nd so on.

    If you are a type 2 and on a stimulent, like glucotrol, you are always stimulating what beta cells you have. Tht is encouraging them to make more insulin. As it has been disocvered the beata cells has only a short lifespan. And like anything else when constantly stimulated toproduce more of what is has limited supply of it can do one thing eventaully. tHta is stop producing insulin.

    On tsimulents medications theer is a five year maximum window. You ahve to be iligent in your dietm testing and exercise to reach this maximum.
    If however your guy was like me, as diligent as you are, your pancrease fails. it exhausts itself.
    So type 2s turn into non insulin producing type 1s.
    Often this is called pancreatic failure, or pancreatiic exhaustion.
    There is no way to bring back beta cells at all. Sooooooooooo
    blood levels of insulin drop to almost nothing or nothing and you have to go on insulin.. also commnly refrred to as Full blown diabetes to some. Now heeres the kicky part. Its actually great that he is on insulin. this means that many complications can be avoied and controlled more.
    IN type 2 we see more ocmplications because we are still relying on teh body for insulin production and diet and exercise to cope.
    In uinsulin usage we are doing teh same butactually we have more freedom and varaitions.
    we can immediately control spikes during illnesses like colds, if we happen to spike for food reasons, which happens especially when eating ot and we cant count carbs, we can take a shot and calculate abolus.
    We often have more control of neuropathy, and beleiev it or not, many men who go oninsulin experience less ED than those who are oral medis.
    We have less likely hood to have mood swings and are more active. We just feel better. Our wounds heal quicker as well. I had a thrid degreeburn on my arm. It was horrible. I pulle dmy diet in and balanced with 10 units R in teh am and the burn healed within two weeks! and teh hair grew back. Where I had oral meds I have scars from injuries.
    I personally was thrilled when I had to go on insulin. I eat better, actually enjoying food instead of being abolute control and mastry of it.
    Since going on insulin I have begiun explroations into diaebtci gourmet cooking.. instea do stickin with tried and true countedversions. Like I have said its really afreedom and better control!

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    • #3
      I remember when he went on shots last year, he was mortified of having to stick himself twice a day.

      When you say you pulled your diet in. I guess you cut out your carb/sugar intake. Ive read on food labels 0-1 grams of sugar but then I see the carbs and arent these the same as sugar eventually and how do I calculate this as I want to abolish as many as I can and try to get myself well.

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      • #4
        Hello! This is a very common question! Many people (and doctors who are not familiar with diabetes!) tend to be confused on the 2 main types of diabetes.

        While Type 1 diabetes USED to be called "insulin dependent" diabetes and Type 2 called "non-insulin dependent", this is no longer the case since many Type 2's use insulin! They are very different diseases with VERY different causes and treatments.

        Type 1 diabetes refers to the type of diabetes that cannot be prevented and is not associated with lifestyle. It is caused by the body's own immune system mistakenly destroying the cells that produce insulin. This is called an autoimmune disease. People tend to develop Type 1 diabetes at a young age (average age is 13 but babies can also develop it) and often have other autoimmune disorders like autoimmune thyroid disease and Celiac Disease.

        Type 1 diabetes has a genetic component and an unknown trigger in the environment that is needed for the disease to develop. The trigger may be a virus or bacterial infection.

        People with Type 1 have antibodies to their beta (insulin making) cells, are usually thin, have a low or zero c-peptide, and are very insulin sensitive, meaning they use fairly small amounts of insulin. They are prone to ketones, low blood sugar, and swings in blood sugar. They need multiple shots of insulin daily or they will die.

        Type 2 diabetes is insulin resistance. This is the common form caused usually by being overweight, poor diet, and being inactive.Often people with Type 2 make too MUCH insulin, and their cells become resistant to its effects. While many Type 2's can get by with diet and exercise, most need medications to lower insulin resistance, and some even need insulin shots. Even if they still make their own insulin, they need the shots because the need is so great because of the insulin resistance. Many times, you will find these people on very high doss of insulin (more than 60 units a day) and they will also take oral medication with the insulin, unlike Type 1's.

        Sometimes, a Type 2 will need insulin because they failed to control the disease in its early stages with weight loss, proper diet, and exercise. Long term exposure to high blood glucose is toxic to beta cells, and can kill them.

        Type 2 diabetics, even if they use or need insulin, are still Type 2 diabetics, because they still have INSULIN RESISITANCE, which is the cause of their diabetes. A Type 2 diabetic still has this form of diabetes, no matter what their treatment.

        There are other rarer forms of diabetes, such as MODY. MODY is a RARE genetic form of diabetes which appears to be a group of specific genetic defects that runs in families. It is inherited in a autosomal dominant fashion, meaning a parent has a 50% chance of passing it on. It seems to cause diabetes by affecting how insulin is released from the pancreas by a chemical pathway. Some with MODY need insulin, some don't. MODY is not Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. It usually occurs in young and thin people. Another form of genetic diabetes is called the "Kirk 6" mutation. It is found in some infants who appear to develop diabetes before 6 months of age. These kids can take eventually oral meds instead of insulin. This defect is VERY rare.


        There are other types of diabetes, but I hope this answers your question!

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        • #5
          I forgot to mention that Type 1 diabetes appears "suddenly" with very obvious symptoms. People with Type 1 will go into a coma and die very quickly if not treated with insulin.

          Type 2 diabetes often devlops slowly, and a person may have it for a long time without knowing it.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Team Diabetes View Post
            I forgot to mention that Type 1 diabetes appears "suddenly" with very obvious symptoms. People with Type 1 will go into a coma and die very quickly if not treated with insulin.

            Type 2 diabetes often devlops slowly, and a person may have it for a long time without knowing it.

            Appears? You can wake up one day with it and then die because it has attacked you without warning? I thought it came after the type 2, now I am confused a bit more.

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            • #7
              Type 1 diabetes is a different kind of diabetes from Type 2

              Type 1 does NOT come after Type 2. Type 1 is an entirely different disease. People with Type 1 develop it (usually) very suddenly. They will have severe symptoms, and will need insulin very soon or they will go into a coma and die. The onset can take anywhere from a few weeks to months. Type 1's have a severe insulin deficiency caused by the destruction of their insulin producing cells by their immune system

              Type 1 usually first appears in children. It used to be called "juvenile diabetes" or "insulin-dependent diabetes". Now these terms are no longer used, since adults can get Type 1, and some Type 2 diabetics use insulin. Also, obese children are now getting Type 2 diabetes.

              Type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease. Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder caused by insulin resistance.

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              • #8
                I should mention that if a Type 2 needs to take insulin, they still have Type 2 diabetes. Their form of diabetes does not change, but their treatment does. Some doctors use the term "Type 1" to describe someone who uses insulin, but that is outdated and not correct. Type 1 nowadays is used to describe autoimmune diabetes, since we now know there are 2 major types of diabetes, very different from each other.

                A person can be an insulin-dependent Type 2.

                Hope this helps!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Team Diabetes View Post
                  Type 1 does NOT come after Type 2. Type 1 is an entirely different disease. People with Type 1 develop it (usually) very suddenly. They will have severe symptoms, and will need insulin very soon or they will go into a coma and die. The onset can take anywhere from a few weeks to months. Type 1's have a severe insulin deficiency caused by the destruction of their insulin producing cells by their immune system

                  Type 1 usually first appears in children. It used to be called "juvenile diabetes" or "insulin-dependent diabetes". Now these terms are no longer used, since adults can get Type 1, and some Type 2 diabetics use insulin. Also, obese children are now getting Type 2 diabetes.

                  Type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease. Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder caused by insulin resistance.
                  This is a very excellent explaination for me. I have often heard the term juvenile diabetes. Thank you for putting this in a simple (almost) way to understand. I am still having my learning issues, but I'm getting a better feel after seeing this.

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                  • #10
                    This is something that is scary for anyone knowing that this can develop anytime to anyone just because. Its about catching the symptoms and how do you do that.

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                    • #11
                      Most people do not have the genes for Type 1 diabetes, and it is fairly rare. About 0.5% of the population has it. It also usually develops before age 30. If an adult does develop it, the onset is usually slow, and the symptoms are not as abrupt. Slow onset Type 1 in adults in called LADA.

                      In Type 1 diabetes, you will usually look and feel so sick that you will go to the doctor before you end up in a coma. Symptoms like sudden weight loss, vomiting, stomach pain, a rapid heart rate, excess urination and thirst, and severe fatigue are really hard to ignore.

                      However, many cases are still diagnosed in the ER after a person falls into a coma. This tends to happen more in people and families who have only heard of Type 2 diabetes (which is linked to older age and obesity), and are not aware of Type 1 diabetes. Many people don't realize that a typical Type 1 diabetic is young, fit, active, and thin upon diagnosis. Type 1 diabetes has *nothing* to do with weight or lifestyle, and it can't be prevented.

                      Other cases first diagnosed in the ER usually occur in very young children and infants, who seem to have a more "sudden onset".

                      Sadly, kids still do die today because their parents didn't know what Type 1 diabetes is. Type 2 diabetes and the obesity epidemic is in the media a lot, and often no mention of Type 1 is ever made to mark the difference between the two and show that there is another form of diabetes.

                      In one recent survey, it was found that 80% of people didn't know the difference between the two main forms of diabetes, and that 58% had no idea there even *was* 2 major forms. Furthermore, a large majority of those people thought that Type 1 diabetes could be cured with insulin, diet, weight loss, or exericse, or prevented, all of these incorrect. Type 1 diabetes has nothing to do with lifestyle or weight, and there is no cure or prevention, only daily insulin injections for life.

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                      • #12
                        Team Diabetes, thank you for the explanation-I was about to jump in till I kept reading down. It is important I think that people remember the difference, because although we all face complications the two diseases really are different.

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                        • #13
                          Team Diabetes,
                          Thanks for that excellent explanation of the difference between type 1 and type 2!
                          I get so frustrated when I hear type 2's say they've suddenly become type 1's because they are taking insulin!

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                          • #14
                            Where can I find information and pictures breaking down the process of understanding Diabetes. Has there ever been a PBS special?

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                            • #15
                              I did a search on the pbs website and they have done some programs about diabetes, mostly type 2 diabetes. If you put diabetes in the search box on their website you will find a lot of programs and some of them include their transcripts that you can read. If you put watch online diabetes in the search box you will find some frontline stories about diabetes that you can watch online.

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